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Johannesburg, South Africa

My Blog

There are so many good things to do in the city, and I try to catch as many of them as possible.

 

There are hidden gems in Joburg, like the Randlords' mansions, or the secrets of Braamfontein Cemetery, or the hidden mural of the church in Sophiatown, or the restaurant where Nelson Mandela took Winnie on their first date, or the artesian well in the Alberts' Farm park. These and other secrets you'll learn about on my tours.

 

This blog will take you on these journeys - come and explore Jozi with me, and learn things about the city you didn't know about. Like I have done for many years, I will interview people who make this city what it is.

 

Come along on the journey. 

January 15, 2020

In mid-December I tramped through clumps of grass and stood on rocky outcrops listening to Anglo-Boer War enthusiast Rob Milne explaining how the Battle of Nooitgedacht unfolded on top of the Magaliesberg mountain top.

It’s a compelling story, with victory going to the Boers, with the Brits, under Major-General Ralph Clements, retreating to Pretoria as soon as they got the chance.

There were 10 fierce battles in the Magaliesberg...

December 11, 2019

A month or so ago I got an email via my website from Simon Ndlovu. He was upset by the plaque alongside the seated bronze sculpture of Kippie Moeketsi in Newtown, outside the old Kippies club.

“This narrative that he was the sad man of jazz, is tiring. There is a very important reason for that state, he got cheated by record labels, they made millions out of his work, yet he died a pauper,” wrote Simon.

He goes on to say that Ki...

December 1, 2019


 

I spent the morning in a graveyard. Not just any graveyard, but the 54ha Braamfontein Cemetery, the city’s first, laid out in 1887.

This is my third Sunday morning visit. Well, actually, it’s not a visit, it’s a headstone cleaning morning. And what fun it is, if you like graveyards, and history and stuff.

I’ve cleaned five headstones of moss and algae so far, and brought alive people’s memories from 1897, and thereabouts. Two...

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